Dominican opportunities in America through Baseball

Dominican baseball players pursue better life in America by playing baseball to make it out of their home country.

When it comes to baseball, it comes as second nature to Dominican players. Baseball is more than a sport to Dominicans, it’s a culture and a way to create better opportunities. These opportunities create a better life in the United States, an opportunity at college and a way to provide for your family financially.

The Dominican baseball culture is about doing something you love to distract yourself from reality in the motherland of the Dominican Republic. It comes with fire and passion to make it out of the Dominican Republic because baseball is the only way.

A portrait of Dwight Morrow’s team captain and Dominican Native Orlando Sosa Jr. at the team’s picture day right before the season started in early March.

For Dominican native Orlando Sosa Jr, a junior at Dwight Morrow, baseball was the way for him to have better opportunities in life. Sosa was brought to the United States at the age 5 by his parents for a better life.

When he arrived, he instantly started playing baseball and grew love for the game. Since arriving to the US, baseball has meant the world to him and has been his life. When it comes to baseball, Dominicans don’t have to force energy because it’s already instilled in them and comes as second nature. It’s what they breathe, eat and sleep.

“Being a descent for the Dominican Republic definitely makes a difference because it’s your culture and it’s expected from you,” said Sosa.

One of the opportunities baseball creates for young Dominican baseball players in America are college scholarships. In the Dominican Republic, kids don’t receive an education like an American one.

“The opportunities baseball has given me in the United States is honestly to gain a scholarship to go to school for free and that’s something to be proud of .”

Orlando Sosa Jr.

For Sosa Jr, a college scholarship to a division one school is in arms reached because of what baseball has created for him. A college scholarship not only gives you an opportunity for a degree but gives you an opportunity to make it professional to the MLB.

Dominicans born players took up 38.72% of the league’s international population in 2017 with 170 players and took up 36.74% in 2018 with 158 born players. Baseball comes with advantages for Dominicans in the Major leagues because of its disadvantages.

In the Dominican Republic, baseball resources are limited compared to the United States. ” I think the lack in resources in the Dominican Republic obviously put them at a disadvantage, but it creates a fire in their belly,” said coach Mario Lugones Jr.

The equipment used in the United States is far more advanced than the equipment used in the Dominican Republic. “Over there we use milk cartons as gloves and here we use nice new gloves. Here we use new bats and over there we use wooden sticks, it’s a big difference,” said Sosa Jr. The disadvantages creates passion and work ethic to strive to be great.

” In the Dominican republic, the fields aren’t treated as well as our homie field here at Dwight Morrow,” said senior centerfielder Lewin Ortiz. Thats an advantage to Dominicans because they are accustomed to playing on bad conditioned fields that creates all types of miscues so when they play on a perfect conditioned field the game is smoother.

The Dwight Morrow baseball is a prime example of what Dominican baseball culture is.They play the game with passion and energy for those back home who don’t have the opportunity here in the United States.

Since taking over the team, coach Mario Lugones Jr has sent 4 kids to college from Dwight Morrow high school, all 4 being Dominican descent. Coach Mario plans to add to that number in the coming years and plans to win bring back a championship to Dwight Morrow.

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